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Academic Programs


From its roots as a Territorial Normal School established to train teachers for work in the public schools of the Arizona Territory, Arizona State University developed into a multi-purpose institution that provides educational opportunities to a diverse student population. A century of academic growth ushered in a university that offers a variety of subject areas and disciplines with enrollment of 50,365 on the university's three campuses for the fall semester of 2000.


 

By an Act of the Legislative Assembly of Arizona, approved March 10, 1885, provision was made for the establishment of a Normal School at Tempe, Arizona.


The institution was charged to provide "instruction of persons, both male and female, in the arts of teaching and in all various branches that pertain to good common school education: also, to give instruction in the mechanical arts and in husbandry and agricultural chemistry, the fundamental law of the United States, and in what regards the rights and duties of citizens."


Three aspects of the Act affected the development of the school: it had no official name; although a normal school is designed to train teachers, instruction in mechanical arts and animal husbandry and agricultural chemistry were included; and the 3-year curriculum was dedicated to training for teachers to serve in the public schools of Arizona.


The school's name changed three times in its first fifteen years. In 1901 it was officially named Normal School of Arizona to distinguish it from the Flagstaff Normal School. The last four name changes are associated with expansions of the curriculum and the degrees offered.

Territorial Normal School at Tempe 1885-1889


Admission requirements were a minimum age of 16 years old and successful completion of an entrance examination. Advanced placement by examination was accepted with 22 weeks of attendance. The principal taught all subjects. Until 1923 sub-normal classes were offered to students lacking in a high school diploma. Upon completion of requirements a diploma and teaching certificate were awarded. On the first day of school there was one teacher and 33 students.

Click any image below or its brief caption to see a larger version of the image and the complete caption. Items marked with an * have additional explanatory text included with the larger image.
Normal School, 1886 Normal School Opening Day, 1886 Course of Study, 1886-87
Normal School
February 8, 1886
Normal School
Opening Day
February 8, 1886
Course of Study
(5 pages)
1886-87


Arizona Territorial Normal School 1889-1896

In 1889 the curriculum continued to reflect teacher training. A teaching certificate for grammar school education required two years of course work, extensive testing and at least 18 years of age. In 1891 the faculty increased to two instructors, the Principal and Assistant Principal for 30 students.

Faculty and student body, 1890 Course of Study, 1888-1890
Faculty and student body
1890
Course of Study
1888-1890


Normal School of Arizona, 1896-1903

In 1899, the requirement for a diploma increased to a three year course with a show of proficiency in academic and professional (teacher instruction) studies. In 1900 there were six faculty members and 131 students. The old Normal Building now housed the new Training School where the student teachers gained practical skills.

 California Accreditation, 1902 Chemistry class, 1898 Study Hall, 1898
California Accreditation
1902
* Chemistry class
1898
Study Hall in Old Main
1898
Students and student teachers in the training school classroom, 1890s Biennial Report to 23rd Legislature, 1902-03 and 1903-04 Broadway and Moeur Medal, 1900
* Students and student teachers
in the training school classroom
1890s
Normal Biennial Report to 23rd Legislature
1902-03 and 1903-04
Broadway and Moeur Medal,
1900
Bessie Hedgpeth Collection
Artifact #16


Tempe Normal School 1903-1925

Due to a Normal School opening in Flagstaff, the legislature instituted an official and legal name in 1901, Tempe Normal School, that was established in all publications in 1903. The Department of Manual Arts (1906) and classes in Agriculture (1912) were introduced into the curriculum as was legislated in the original act in 1885. In President Teddy Roosevelt's speech at the school, agriculture courses were encouraged. The curriculum finally resembled the 1885 legislation and met the needs of the local people. In 1919, there were 38 faculty members and 320 students. Both the Manual Arts and Agriculture programs evolved into departments in the college, then the university.

Biology Class, 1903 Math Class, 1900s Department of Sloyd and Manual Training, 1906-07 catalog
* Biology Class
1903
* Math Class
1900s
Department of Sloyd
and Manual Training
(2 pages)
1906-07 catalog
Domestic Science Department, 1910 Art Department, 1908 Louise B. Lynd, 1920
* Domestic Science
Department
1910
* Art Department
1908
Principal Louise B. Lynd
of Rural Training School
1920
Pupils' cultivation garden, 1922 Class in Stock Judging, ca. 1913 Pennant
Pupils' cultivation garden
1922
* Class in Stock Judging
ca. 1913
Pennant
Artifact #301
Agriculture Curriculums, 1915 Winning Team, State Fair, 1920 Tempe Normal Farm, 1920s
Agriculture Curriculums
1915
Winning Team, State Fair
1920
* Tempe Normal Farm
1920s


Tempe State Teachers College 1925-1928

The Alumni Association sponsored a move to raise the level of the Normal School to a teachers' college. In 1923, the college admission requirements were raised to a high school diploma. The Normal School, with 41 faculty members and 672 students, became a teachers' college in 1925 with the power to establish a four year-college curriculum offering a Bachelor of Education. A two year curriculum was also offered, leading to a diploma to teach in Arizona elementary schools. An additional two years earned a Bachelor of Education degree. The Bachelor of Arts in Education, usually conferred by a University, was not authorized until 1929. (LD179.15 1940 T46)

Act changing Tempe Normal School to Tempe State Teachers College, 1925 Governor Hunt signing legislation for name change, March 7, 1925 Name Change parade, 1925
Act changing Tempe
Normal School to Tempe
State Teachers College
1925
Governor Hunt signing
legislation for name change
March 7, 1925
Name Change parade
1925


Arizona State Teachers College 1928-1945

The Bachelor of Arts in Education degree was authorized by an act of the Ninth Legislature in 1929. Students completing a four year course were eligible for graduate work in education at a university, and would receive secondary certificates permitting them to teach in Arizona high schools. The requirement for diploma and grade school teaching certificates increased to a three year curriculum.


In the early 1930's, Arizona State needed permanent national accreditation to be recognized as an educational institution of quality, but eligibility requirements of accrediting organizations specified that a large percentage of faculty must hold advanced degrees, particularly doctorates. As a result, many faculty contracts were terminated and new faculty hired at the height of the Depression.


In 1933, North Central Association (NCA) Accreditation recognized the college as a liberal arts and science college that granted the students a degree to teach in high schools and to earn advanced degrees at other institutions throughout the country.


In 1937 Arizona State offered its first graduate degree, the Masters in Education. Although courses were offered in other academic and professional disciplines, the school remained a teachers college until 1945.

Industrial Arts curriculum, 1927-28 Ira D. Payne Training School, ca. 1940s Patch
Industrial Arts curriculum
1927-28
Ira D. Payne Training School
ca. 1940s
Patch
Artifact #162
Industrial Arts Education, ca. 1934 Industrial Arts Education, ca. 1945
Industrial Arts Education
ca. 1934
Industrial Arts Education
ca. 1945
Aircraft Mechanics Class, ca. 1945
Aircraft Mechanics Class
ca. 1945


Arizona State College 1945-1958

With the end of World War II, as the soldiers returned and demand for additional degree programs increased, the legislature granted Arizona State, with 68 faculty members and 1446 students, the authority to confer non-education degrees. The Board of Regents, formed in 1945, authorized Arizona State College the authority to grant Bachelor of Art (BA) and Bachelor of Science (BS) degrees, and in 1946 approved the Liberal Arts and Sciences program. In the early 1950s, the Board of Regents asked the U.S. Department of Education to assess the state of higher education in Arizona and in 1934 the resulting Hollis Commission recommended university status for Arizona State, suggesting all programs be incorporated into a four college system: College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; The College of Education; The College of Applied Arts and Sciences; and The College of Business Administration. These charges were instituted in the 1955-56 school year. The 1960s saw rapid academic growth with the addition of seven colleges and numerous research centers. The 1970s and '80s were fertile ground for research, culminating in the achievement of Research I status in 1993.

Gov. Sidney P. Osborn signs Name Change, 1945 Honors and Awards Assembly, 1950s
Name change to "Arizona State College"
Legislation being signed by Governor
Sidney P. Osborn
1945
Honors and Awards Assembly
1950s
Arnold Tilden, Founding Dean of College of Liberal Arts, 1955 Emil John Hilkert, first Founding Dean of Business Administration, 1955
* Arnold Tilden, Founding Dean
of College of Liberal Arts
1955
* Emil John Hilkert, first Founding
Dean of Business Administration
1955
Guy D. McGrath, Founding Dean of College of Education, 1955 A.S.C. Seal Decal
Guy D. McGrath, Founding Dean
of College of Education
1955
A.S.C. Seal Decal
Artifact #156


Arizona State University 1958-present

By 1958 Arizona State College performed all the functions of a university, gaining approval for Masters of Arts and Masters of Science degrees in the new disciplines. Expansion of the programs sparked new interest from the community, but supporters of the University of Arizona at Tucson stonewalled several legislative proposals for renaming the institution. After a lengthy and emotional "name change" drive Arizona State University was finally authorized by a direct vote of Arizona citizens for Proposition 200 in the November elections. The name change was signed by Governor Ernest McFarland on December 5, 1958.

Reg Manning Editorial Cartoon (Name Change), 1958 Name Change to Arizona State University, 1958 'Vote 200 Yes' Pin
Reg Manning Editorial Cartoon
(Name Change)
1958
Name change to
"Arizona State University"
December 5, 1958
"Vote 200 Yes" Pin
Artifact #122
ASU Name Change - Waiting for election results, 1958 Irving W. Stout, Founding Dean of the Graduate College, 1958 Founding Engineering Dean Lee P. Thompson, 1963
ASU Name Change
Waiting for election results
1958
* Irving W. Stout
Founding Dean of the
Graduate College
1958
* Founding Dean Lee P. Thompson
College of Engineering
1963
James W. Elmore, Founding Dean of the College of Architecture, 1972 Henry Bruinsma, Founding Dean of the College of Fine Arts, 1956 Willard H. Pedrick, Founding Dean of the College of Law, 1967
* James W. Elmore,
Founding Dean of the
College of Architecture
1972
* Henry Bruinsma,
Founding Dean of the
College of Fine Arts
1956
* Willard H. Pedrick,
Founding Dean of the
College of Law
1967
Loretta H. Hanner, Founding Dean of the College of Nursing, 1964 Roy Rice, Founding Dean of the School of Continuing Education and Summer Sessions, 1958 Horace W. Lundberg, Founding Dean of the School of Social Work, 1965-66
* Loretta H. Hanner,
Founding Dean of the
College of Nursing
1964
* Roy Rice,
Founding Dean of the
School of Continuing Education
and Summer Sessions
1958
* Horace W. Lundberg,
Founding Dean of the
School of Social Work
1965-66
Nicholas Henry, Founding Dean of the School of Public Programs, 1979 Ted Humphrey, Founding Dean of The Barrett Honors College, 2000 Dennis P. Prisk, Founding Dean of the College of Extended Education, 1990
* Frank L. Sackton,
Founding Dean of the
College of Public Programs
1987
* Ted Humphrey
Founding Dean of
The Barrett Honors College
2000
Dennis P. Prisk
Founding Dean of the
College of Extended Education
(2 pages)
1990
ASU West, Opening Day, 1986 A.S.U. Seal Decal Chuck Backus,	Provost of ASU East, 1996
* ASU West, Opening Day
1986
A.S.U. Seal Decal
Artifact #145
* Chuck Backus
Provost of ASU East
1996
ASU sites to visit for more information on this topic:

About the University, 2000
http://www.asu.edu/about/

Academic Programs
http://www.asu.edu/programs/



University Archives
Department of Archives and Manuscripts
Arizona State University Libraries
Last updated: December, 2001
Send questions or comments to archives@mainex1.asu.edu
Title Page / Introduction / Chronology / Academic Freedom: Academic Programs, Research / Campus Lives: Campus Scenes, Student Organizations, Athletes / Leadership / Community, Collaboration and Partnership / Landmarks / Bibliography & Links / Credits