ASU Teacher of the Month--Randall Cerveny

Teacher of the Month--
Randall Cerveny

Randall Cerveny, an Associate Professor of Geography since 1991 and creator of the ASU Storm Chasers, has traveled to every continent to learn more about the Earth's climate. This enthusiasm for his work places him in high estee m with students and others in his field. Royal Norman, Channel 3 staff meteorologist said, "He has always demonstrated a high degree of excellence in his work and is dedicated to his students and furthering their understanding of meteorology." Cerveny bel ieves he is obligated to inspire his students. "If an instructor fails to interest a student, the instructor has done a disservice to the student and the profession," he said.



Teaching Philosophy

Throughout my academic career, I have been extremely fortunate to have superb mentors whose successful methods of teaching I have tried to incorporate into my personal teaching philosophy. I am equally fortunate to have outstanding learned colleagues her e at ASU with whom I can interact and develop new teaching methods and ideas. Based on those contacts and my own experiences in the classroom, my personal goals in teaching have resolved into three main objectives: to maintain and promote enthusiasm, prac ticality and creativity in my chosen subject, Geography.

I believe enthusiasm is one of the most critical aspects of successful teaching. If an instructor fails to interest a student--if that instructor is unable to motivate a student--then it is likely that student will not succeed and the instructor has done a disservice to the student and the profession. Motivation is particularly pertinent in an academic discipline such as Geography where there is an extremely limited number of majors entering the discipline as freshmen. In contrast to many subjec ts, the number of majors in Geography is directly linked to the interest that we instructors generate in our large lecture 100-level classes (Introduction to Physical Geography and Introduction to Human Geography).

Consequently, I have particularly focused my efforts in my 100-level classes towards the goal of promoting interest and excitement about Geography--and Meteorology, in particular. By bringing discussion of real-world events such as tornadoes, hurricanes a nd the greenhouse effect into the class, I strive to ignite students' own interest in the subject. My methods of instruction--video and slides of spectacular natural events, personal anecdotes, field trips and extracurriculum projects--all are especially geared towards promoting interest in Geography. I personally measure my success in achieving this by the number of students who switch their majors into Geography based on their experiences in my 100-level classes. To my satisfaction over the last eight y ears here at ASU, I have observed a larger and larger number of new majors in our discipline. I am particularly pleased at the increasing number of women and minorities in our program over the past few years--several of whom are now working for the Nation al Weather Service, private and governmental agencies such as Salt River Project and in graduate programs around the country.

In addition, I and my colleagues have recently attempted to reach beyond the level of our 100-level classes to promote excitement and interest in Geography. We have given teaching inservices at many local grade and secondary schools, set up displays at university functions such as the ASU Superbowl Experience and ASU's "Super Science" day, and developed strong connections with the local media (up and including having our Geography graduates and students working at local television stations as meteorolog ists). I also feel fortunate to have been appointed as a contributing editor to Weatherwise, an educational magazine dedicated to promoting public interest in weather and meteorology.

Practicality may seem an odd component of my teaching philosophy but it arises due to the nature of training required for our specialty program in Climate and Meteorology of which I am in charge. The requirements of our program are based on the s pecifications of the National Weather Service. In other words, in order to work for the National Weather Service, our students must fulfill a tough set of courses in mathematics, physics and meteorology. Consequently, I strive in my teaching (a) to give o ur students a rigorous caliber of instruction of that will give them the ability to compete successfully for jobs against students from other universities, (b) as much as possible, to give them the opportunity for "extra" training and experience that will give them additional leverage when competing for jobs, and (c) to incorporate the recommendations of former students working as professional meteorologists (with whom I strive to keep in contact) to improve and update my courses.

With regard to the second point, on my own time and contributing my own money, I have developed a major program--now in its eighth year--between ASU, the National Weather Service, and the local media called the "Arizona Thunderstorm Chase Project." This p roject has our ASU students acting as "mobile eyes" for the National Weather Service during our summer thunderstorm season, the monsoon. I am pleased to find that this experience has (a) motivated our students by giving them hands-on experience, (b) have allowed our students to develop networking skills with their potential employers, and (c) been recognized in the primary technical journal of meteorologists, the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

Promoting creativity is a facet of my personal teaching philosophy that I hold particularly dearNess is one of the most difficult to accomplish. However the effort is extremely worthwhile. It is my contention that the best students, the best grad uate researchers, and ultimately the best professors are those who maintain and stress creativity in all aspects of their work. Consequently, I make a determined effort to avoid rote-learning and, instead, encourage student to develop their own methods of learning and discover their talents. I personally make an effort to go beyond the normal and expected. For example, I have published, in addition to my fundamental research on computer climate modeling, a variety of professional articles on such odd topi cs as "the weather associated with prison escapes" and "why didn't Columbus hit a hurricane in 1492?" These articles have produced much local and national interest--and potentially new majors.

As an example of creativity in the classroom, one subject that I teach--weather forecasting--is a skill that is both a science and art. Although it increases the difficulty in grading students' abilities, I maintain frequent 'real-world, real-time' foreca sting exercises where students must take the same base information that the National Weather Service uses and, over the course of an hour or two, must develop real weather forecasts upon which they are then evaluated. As another example, rather than simpl y use historical examples in studying Climate Change, I have developed exercises that use the concept of a hypothetical world to encourage students to test and evaluate the concepts they have learned in a new and hopefully exciting framework.

These three objectives--creativity, practicality and enthusiasm--mark my personal teaching philosophy. Although the accomplishments of my students in their post-graduate careers and their lives in general is undoubtedly due to their own abilities and tale nts, their achievements give me hope that, at least to some degrees Shave been successful in meeting those objectives.

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Curriculum Vitae - Randall Cerveny


VITA
Office Address:
338 COB
Dept. of Geography
Arizona State University
Tempe,AZ 85287-0104
Tel: (602) 965-7533 or 2224
FAX: (602) 965-8313
Home Address:
2525 S. McClintock Dr. #110
Tempe, AZ 85282
Tel: (602) 966-2003
INTERNET: [email protected]
Personal Data:
Born - 28 July 1959
Marital Status - Single
Health - Excellent
Citizenship - United States
Education :
Doctor of Philosophy degree (Geography)
University of Nebraska
August, 1986
Master of Arts (Geography)
University of Nebraska
May, 1983
Bachelor of Science with Distinction
University of Nebraska
May, 1981
Professional Involvement:
1991-presentAssociate Professor, Department of Geography
Arizona State University
1994-present Contributing Editor, Weatherwise
1993 Member, Climate Assessment Select Committee, Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses Nuclear Regulatory Commission Contract NRC 02-88-005. Project Director: A.R. DeWispelare.
1986 - 1991 Assistant Professor, Department of Geography
Arizona State University, Dr. P. Gober,chair
1985 - 1986 Participant in the 1985-6 NSF AntarctiG Research Program with Polar Ice Coring Office
1981 Chief consulting geographer to HDR, Inc. - MX missile environmental impact report

Organizations:

Association of American Geographers
American Meteorological Society
Sigma XI, the Scientific Research Society
The National Space Society
The Explorers Club (New York)

Committee Service:

National

Community/Local

University

Major Advisor to Graduate Students (chair, only)
Name
David W. Stahle
John Shaffer
Nancy Selover
Date of Graduation
August, 1990, Ph.D.
May, 1994, M.A.
December, 1995, M.A.
Present Position
Assoc. Prof, Arkansas
Ph.D. student, ASU
Ph.D. student, ASU

Selected Honors. Awards & Accomplishments:

Sponsored Projects:

1995 The Influence Of Local Circulation Patterns On Convective Precipitation And Thunderstorm Development: Phoenix AZ. R.S. Cerveny, N.J. Selover, D. Green and T. Craver. NOAA/National Weather Service COMET program. $4200.
1994 Desert Research Institute
1992 Orbitally-Induced Variations in the Diurnal Cycle of Radiation. Randall S. Cerveny. National Science Foundation Geography & Regional Science. $41,000.
1992 Research Incentive for Undergraduates: Orbitally-Induced Variations in the Diurnal Cycle of Radiation. Randall S. Cerveny. National Science Foundation. $5,000.
1992 AZTC (Arizona Thunderstorm Chasing) Project. Arizona State University/National Weather Service. Funding through local media sources (KTAR radio and local weathercastes), $1800.
1991 British Frontal Storms. R.C. Balling, Jr., R. S. Cerveny, S. Idso. British Coal Institute. $38,000.
1991-1989 AZTC (Arizona Thunderstorm Chasing) Project. Arizona State University/National Weather Service. Funding through local media sources (KTAR radio; KTSP TV; KPNX TV) $5,500.
1988 Analysis of Weather Normalization Procedures. Salt River Project. Part 2. Robert Balling and Randall Cerveny. $20,000.
1988 Analysis of Weather Normalization Procedures. Salt River Project. Part 1. Robert Balling and Randall Cerveny. $5000.
1987-1988 Selected Wind Speed and Temperature Probabilities in Phoenix, Arizona. Robert Balling and Randall S. Cerveny. Salt River Project, $4,998.
1987 Wind Direction Analysis at St. Johns, Arizona. Salt River Project. Robert Balling and Randall Cerveny. $7000.

Selected Recent Articles & Professional Publications:

1996 Visualization of Milankovitch Climate-Change Theory. H.J. Wolters, J.A. Shaffer, R.S. Cerveny and R.E. Barnhill. Journal of Geoscience Education, 44: 7-12.

A new approach to paleoclimatic research using Linear Programming. M. Kuby, R.S. Cerveny and R.A. Dorn. Paleogeography, Paleoclimatology, Paleoecology, in press.

1995 The Influence of Lunar Phase on Daily Global Temperatures. R.C. Balling, Jr. and R.S. Cerveny. Science, 267: 1481-1482.

Lunar Phase Influence on Global Temperatures. J.C.Dyre, C.V. Voorhies; R.C. Balling, Jr. and R.S. Cerveny. Science, 269: 1284-1285.

Milankovitch radiation cycles. R.S. Cerveny, J.A. Shaffer, N.J. Selover. In McGraw-Hill Yearbook of Science and Technology 1995 (New York: McGraw-Hill), pp. 275-278.

1994 Elements of Espionage. R.S. Cerveny and M.G. Marcus. Weatherwise. 47: 14-21.

The Impact of Rainfall Frequency on Coca (Etythrozylum coca) Production in the Chapare Region of Bolivia. M.S. McGlade, R. Henkel, R.S. Cerveny, Yearbook, Conference of Latin Americanist Geographers, 20: 97-105.

1993 Meteorological Assessment of Homer's Odyssey. Randall S. Cerveny. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. 74:1025-1034.

Localized Climate Responses During the 11 July 1991 Eclipse: Phoenix AZ. A.J. Brazel, R.S. Cerveny, B.L. Trapido. Climatic Change. 23:155-168.

1992 Impact of the Southern Oscillation on the North American Southwest Monsoon. J.A. Harrington, R. S. Cerveny and R.C. Balling. Physical Geography. 13: 318-330.

Climate and Cocaine. M.S. McGlade, R.S. Cerveny and R. Henkel. Nature, 361, 25.

The Hottest Game in Town. R.S. Cerveny, S. Calderon, M. Hubble. Weatherwise, 45, 26-28.

On the Development of a Real-Time Interactive Storm Observation Program in Phoenix, AZ. R.S. Cerveny, S. Calderon, N. Hoffmann, M. Franjevic. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 73, 773-778.

The Weather Luck of Christopher Columbus. Randall S. Cerveny and J.S. Hobgood. Weatherwise 45: 34 26

The Impact of Snow Cover on Diurnal Temperature Range. Randall S. Cerveny and R.C. Balling, Jr. Journal of Geophysical Letters, 19, 797-800.

Reply (to K. Emmanuel). S.B. Idso, R.C. Balling, Jr., R.S. Cerveny. Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics, 47,85-86.

Meteorological Implications of the First Voyage of Christopher Columbus. R.S. Cerveny and J.S. Hobgood. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 73, 173-179.

1991 Greenhouse Warming May Moderate British Storminess. R.C. Balling, Jr., R.S. Cerveny, T.A. Miller, S.B. Idso. Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics, 46, 181-184.

Orbital Signals in the Diurnal Cycle of Radiation. R.S. Cerveny. Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres. 96, 17209-17215.

Competitive Learning Experiences: The Role of Weather Forecasting Contests in Geography Programs. J. Harrington, R.S. Cerveny and J.S. Hobgood. Journal of Geography, 90, 27-31.

Tree-Ring Reconstructed Sunshine Duration over the Central USA. D.W. Stahle, M.K. Cleaveland and R.S. Cerveny. International Journal of Climatology. 11, 285-295.

1990 Carbon Dioxide and Hurricanes: Implications of Northern Hemispheric Warming for Atlantic/Caribbean Storms. S.B. Idso, R.C. Balling, Jr., R.S. Cerveny. Meteorological and Atmospheric Physics., 42,259-263.

Tall Tale Weather. R.S. Cerveny, J. Schumacher, and C.K. Cerveny. Weatherwise. 43: 248-252.

Inhomogeneities in the Long-Term United States' Sunshine Record. R.S. Cerveny and R.C. Balling, Jr. Journal of Climate, 3 (9), 1045-1048.

Thermal Patterns of Pacific South America Associated with El Ninño/Southern Oscillation. Kevin Walsh and Randall S. Cerveny. Int. Journal of Climatology. 10, 451- 457.

1989 Shadowing of Nonpolluted Locations by Urban Pollution. Randall S. Cerveny. Annals of the Association of American Geographers. 70, 242-256.

Weather of the Pharaohs. Randall S. Cerveny. Weatherwise. 42 (6),307-314.

Wind Field Analysis Using Unit-Vector Density Mapping. Randall S. Cerveny and Stephen J. Lavin. Theoretical and Applied Climatology 39, 218-230.

Sherlock Holmes and the Weather. Randall S. Cerveny and Sandra Brazel. Weatherwise. 42, 80-84.

1988 Ice-Age Hurricanes and Tropical Storms. Jay S. Hobgood and Randall S. Cerveny. Nature 333: 243-245.

Application of Temporal Statistics in Snow Climatological Studies. John A. Harrington and Randall S. Cerveny. Physical Geography. 9, 337-353.

Escaper's Weather: Military Applications. Randall S. Cerveny and Brent R. Skeeter. Department of Defense Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape (SERE) Bulletin. 1: 1-8 (classified).

Reply (to Dr. Cherry). Robert C. Balling and Randall S. Cerveny. Journal of Applied Meteorology 27: 881.

Escaper and Environment. Randall S. Cerveny and Brent R. Skeeter. Journal of Meteorology 13: 265-276.

1987 Winds and Wind Systems. R.C. Balling, R.S. Cerveny and K.F. Dewey. The Encyclopedia of Climatology (J.E. Oliver and R.W. Fairbridge, eds.), New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Publishing, 933-941.

Atmospheric Nomenclature. Randall S. Cerveny. The Encyclopedia of Climatology (J.E. Oliver and R.W. Fairbridge, eds.), New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Publishing, 140-141.

A Preliminary Investigations of a Relationship between South American Snow Cover and the Southern Oscillation. R.S. Cerveny, B.R. Skeeter and K.F. Dewey. Monthly Weather Review 115: 620-623.

The Relationship between Summer Season Rainfall Events and Lake-Surface Area. D.C. Rundquist, M.P. Lawson, L.P. Queen and R.S. Cerveny. Water Resources Bulletin 23: 493-508.

Long-Term Associations between Wind Speeds and the Urban Heat Island of Phoenix, Arizona. Robert C. Balling and R.S. Cerveny. Journal of Climate and Applied Meteorology 26: 712-716.

A Climatology of Mean Monthly Snowfall for the Conterminous United States: Temporal and Spatial Patterns. J.A. Harrington, R.S. Cerveny and K.F. Dewey. Journal of Climate and Applied Meteorology 26: 897-912.

Escapers' Weather. Randall S. Cerveny and Brent R. Skeeter. Weatherwise 40: 248-253.

Unit-Vector Density Mapping. Stephen J. Lavin and Randall S. Cerveny. Cartographic Journal 24: 131-141.

1986 Identification and Analysis of Climatic Fields through Dot Density Shading. Stephen J. Lavin and Randall S. Cerveny. Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology 3: 552-558.
1985 CONSTABLE as a Global Climate Model for Classroom Use. R.S. Cerveny, R.C. Balling and J.A. Schumacher. Journal of Geography 84: 165-168.

Seasonal Temperature Forecasts as Products of Antecedent Linear and Spatial Temperature Arrays. Merlin P. Lawson and Randall S. Cerveny. Journal of Climate and Applied Meteorology 24: 848-859.

Energy Balance Modeling: An Alternative Dynamic Parameterization. Randall S. Cerveny and Robert C. Balling. Journal of Climatology 5: 423-431.

1984 CONSTABLE: A Simple One-Dimensional Climate Model for Climatologists in Geography. Randall S. Cerveny and Robert C. Balling. Professional Geographer 36: 188-196.

Analysis of Time and Space Variations in Long-Term Monthly Averaged Wind Speeds in the United States. Robert C. Balling and Randall S. Cerveny. Wind Engineering 8: 1-8.

Numerical Experiments with the Global Energy Balance Model CONSTABLE. Randall S. Cerveny and Robert C. Balling. Proceedings of the 15th Annual Pittsburgh Conference on Modeling and Simulation. 15: Part 1, 321-326.

Impacts of Nuclear War: Results from a Simple Energy Balance Climate Model. J.A. Schumacher, R.C. Balling and R.S. Cerveny. Physical Geography 5: 199-205.

1983 Spatial and Temporal Variations in Long-Term Normal Percent Possible Solar Radiation Levels in the United States. Robert C. Balling and Randall S. Cerveny. Journal of Climate and Applied Meteorology 22: 1726-1732.

Professional Reports

1993 Expert Elicitation of Future Climate in the Yucca Mountain Vicinity. Iterative Performance Assessment Phase 2.5. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Contract NRC-02 88-005. Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses. August.
1988 Analysis of Weather Normalization Procedures. Salt River Project. Part 1. Robert Balling and Randall Cerveny. Final Report for SRP project.
1987 Wind Direction Analysis at St. Johns, Arizona. R.C. Balling and R.S. Cerveny. Final Report for SRP project.
1985 Variability in the Surface Area of Sandhills Lakes and its Relationship to Precipitation and Groundwater Levels. M.P. Lawson, D.C. Rundquist, R.C. Balling, R.S. Cerveny and L.P. Queen. Occasional Paper #7, Department of Geography, University of Nebraska. 46 pages.

Chemical Content of Precipitation over East Central Nebraska: 1979-1982. Shashi B. Verma and R.S. Cerveny. Progress Report 85-3. Center for Agricultural Meteorology and Climatology, 29 pages.

1983 A Reference Manual for the Global Climate Model CONSTABLE. Randall Cerveny and Robert Balling. Occasional Paper #6, Department of Geography, University of Nebraska. 105 pages. (2 printings.)

Paper Presentations

1993 Climatic Implications of Radiative Dispersion. R.S. Cerveny and J.A. Shaffer. 88th National Meeting of the Associations of American Geographers in Atlanta in April, 1993.

A Digitized Archive of South American Snow Cover. Natalie A. Williams, Randall S. Cerveny and Kenneth F. Dewey. 88th National Meeting of the Associations of American Geographers in Atlanta in April, 1993.

Climate and Cocaine. M. McGlade, R.S. Cerveny and R. Henkel. 88th National Meeting of the Associations of American Geographers in Atlanta in April, 1993.

1992 Long-term Variations in Ultraviolet Radiation. R.S. Cerveny. Mintz Memorial Symposium on Climatic Change. Jerusalem, Israel. December, 1992.

The Weather Luck of Christopher Columbus. R.S. Cerveny. Arizona State University. November, 1992.

The Weather Luck of Christopher Columbus. R.S. Cerveny. Columbus. Lecture Series. Salisbury State University, October, 1992.

The Hour-Glass of the Ice Ages. R.S. Cerveny. Geosciences Lecture Series. Salisbury State University, October 1992.

On the Development of a Real-Time Interactive Storm Observation Program in Phoenix, AZ. R.S. Cerveny, S. Calderon, N. Hoffmann, M. Franjevic. 4th Arizona Severe Weather Symposium in Scottsdale AZ in June, 1992.

The Climatic 'Normalcy" of the Weather of 1492. R.S. Cerveny. 87th National Meeting of the Association of American Geographers in San Diego in April, 1992.

Climatological Aspects of the First Voyage of Christopher Columbus. J.S. Hobgood and R.S. Cerveny. 87th National Meeting of the Association of American Geographers in San Diego in April, 1992.

1991 Carbon Dioxide and Hurricanes. R.S. Cerveny, R.C. Balling, Jr., and S.B. Idso. 86th National Meeting of the Association of American Geographers in Miami in April, 1991.
1990 Trends in Upper Air Circulation: Implications to the Greenhouse Effect. R.S. Cerveny. 85th National Meetingofthe Association of American Geographers in Toronto in March, 1989.

Simulation of Greenhouse Hurricanes. R.S. Cerveny. Global Change Conference, Phoenix Arizona. October, 1990.

1989 Ice-Age Tropical Cyclones: The South Pacific Ocean. R.S. Cerveny and J.S. Hobgood. 3rd Southern Hemispheric Meteorology and Oceanography Conference. November, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
1988 Arroyo Cutting and Flood Event in the American Southwest. S.G. Wells, R.C. Balling and R.S. Cerveny. Geologic Society of America Meeting.

Ice-Age Hurricanes and Tropical Storms. J.S. Hobgood, J.N. Rayner and R.S. Cerveny. 1st Ohio State University Symposium on Supercomputing.

Density Mapping. Randall S. Cerveny. Department of Earth Sciences, New Mexico State University.

Pollution Shadowing. Randall S. Cerveny. Department of Chemistry, Arizona State University.

Escaper's Weather. B.R. Skeeter and R.S. Cerveny. 84th National Meeting of the Association of American Geographers at Phoenix in March, 1988.

Ice-Age Hurricanes and Tropical Storms. J.S. Hobgood, R.S. Cerveny and J.N. Rayner. 84th National Meeting of the Association of American Geographers at Phoenix in March, 1988.

Use of the Balance Equation in Energy Balance Modeling. Randall S. Cerveny. Department of Geography, University of Nebraska.

1987 South American Snow Cover and the Southern Oscillation. R.S. Cerveny, B.R. Skeeter and K.F. Dewey. 83rd National Meeting of the Association of American Geographers at Portland, Oregon in April, 1987.

A Climatology of Mean Monthly Snowfall for the Conterminous United States: Temporal and Spatial Patterns. J .A. Harrington, R. S. Cerveny and K.F. Dewey. 83rd National Meeting of the Association of American Geographers at Portland, Oregon in April, 1987.

Application of Temporal Statistics in Snow Climatological Studies. J.A. Harrington and R.S. Cerveny. 83rd National Meeting of the Association of American Geographers at Portland, Oregon in April, 1987.

Unit-Vector Density Mapping. S.J. Lavin and R.S. Cerveny. 83rd National Meeting of the Association of American Geographers at Portland, Oregon in April, 1987.

1986 Mass-momentum Conservation in Energy Balance Models. Presented at a special session on new climate models at the 82nd National Meeting of the Association of American Geographers at St. Paul, Minnesota in May, 1986.
1985 Seasonal Forecasts from Multivariate Examination of Antecedent Temperature Arrays. Merlin P. Lawson and Randall S. Cerveny. 4th Conference on Applied Climatology, American Meteorological Society.

Conservation Principles in Energy Balance Models. Randall S. Cerveny. Institute of Polar Studies. Ohio State University.

CONSTABLE as a Classroom Climate Model. Randall Cerveny and Robert Balling. Presented at a special session on classroom use of models at the 81st National Meeting of the Association of American Geographers at Detroit, Michigan in April, 1985.

1984 Numerical Experiments with the Global Energy Balance Model CONSTABLE. Randall S. Cerveny and Robert C. Balling. 15th Conference on Modeling and Simulation. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Energy Balance Climate Modeling: Sensitivity Tests. Randall Cerveny. Presented at a special session on climate modeling at the 80th National Meeting of the Association of American Geographers at Washington, D.C. in April, 1984.

1983 A Dynamic Parameterization of a Surface Wind Field into a Sellers Type Global Climate Model. Randall Cerveny. Presented at the 79th National Meeting of the Association of American Geographers at Denver, Colorado in April, 1983.

Additional Professional Activities

Consulting editor, Weatherwise
Reviewer for: Journal of Geophysical Research
Theoretical and Applied Climatology
Professional Geographer
Annals of the AAG
Geographical Review
Journal of Geography
National Science Foundation (NSF)

Djuric's Weather Analysis
Chelius-Frentz: A Basic Meteorology

Exercise Manual

Public Service:

Developer, AZTC (Arizona Thunderstorm Chasing) Project
(Arizona State University/National Weather Service/
KTAR Radio/Salt River Project/KTSP TV)
Interviewed by: KPHX TV, TTVK TV, KPHO TV,
KTSP TV, KFYI Radio
CNN Science & Technology News
Arizona Republic Newspaper
Phoenix Gazette Newspaper
Tucson Citizen
Scottsdale Progress
Mesa/Tempe Tribune
Omaha World Herald Newspaper
Sports Illustrated Magazine
Speaker at numerous civic clubs, nursing homes and elementary schools

Research Interests:

Climatic Modeling
Dynamic Climatology
Climatic Change
Physical Climatology
Synoptic Climatology
Atmospheric Teleconnections

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