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Charles L. Redman
Ph.D., University of Chicago 1971
Julie Ann Wrigley Director, International Institute for Sustainability


SHESC Themes: Societies and Their Natural Environments; Urban Societies

Field specializations: archaeology, complex societies, environmental studies, human environment interaction, land use

Regional focus: Mediterranean, Near East, North America (Southwest)

 

About Research
Redman's interests include human impacts on the environment, sustainable landscapes, rapid urbanizing regions, urban ecology, environmental education and public outreach. The author or co-author of ten books including Explanation in Archaeology, The Rise of Civilization, and People of the Tonto Rim, Human Impact on Ancient Environments, and most recently, The Archaeology of Global Change. He has directed archaeological field projects in the Near East, North Africa and Arizona.

Redman has served as Principal Investigator or Co-Principal Investigator on 50 research grants from Federal, State and Private agencies totaling over $ million. Eight years ago he began co-directing the Central Arizona-Phoenix Long-Term Ecological Research project, the first established by National Science Foundation in an urban arid locale. He is also co-directing the expansion of this urban ecological research to include an innovative interdisciplinary Ph.D. program sponsored by the National Science Foundation (IGERT), a Biocomplexity in the Environment grant on Agricultural Landscapes in Transition and a recently funded Decision Center for a Desert City program.

Redman is also a founding member of the Southwest Center for Education and the Natural Environment (SCENE), is currently the vice president of the state chapter of The Nature Conservancy. He has served as a member of several state and national councils including Chair of the State’s Archaeology Advisory Commission, the Arizona Advisory Council on Environmental Education, and as subcommittee chair of the Governor's Groundwater Management Commissions, as well as a member of the Science Advisory Committees of Biosphere 2 and The Wenner-Gren Foundation.

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About Teaching
Charles Redman received his B.A. from Harvard University, and his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Anthropology from the University of Chicago. He taught at New York University and at SUNY-Binghamton before coming to ASU in 1983. Since then, he served for nine years as Chair of the Department of Anthropology, seven years as the director of the Center for Environmental Studies and in November of 2004 he was chosen to be the Julie Ann Wrigley Director of the newly formed International Institute for Sustainability.

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Select Publications
C.L. Redman (2005)
Resilience in Archaeology. American Anthropology 107(1):70-77

C. L. Redman, S. R. James, P. R. Fish, and J. D. Rogers (2004)
The Archaeology of Global Change: The Impact of Humans on Their Environment. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC. 292 pp.

C. L. Redman, S. R. James, P. R. Fish, and J. D. Rogers, editors (2004)
Human Impacts on Past Environments. In The Archaeology of Global Change: The Impact of Humans on Their Environment. Smithsonian Books, Washington DC. pp. 1-8.

C. L. Redman (2004)
Effects of Agriculture and Urban Society. The Archaeology of Global Change: The Impact of Humans on Their Environment. Smithsonian Books, Washington DC. pp 89-93.

C. L. Redman (2004)
Environmental Degradation and Early Mesopotamian Civilization. The Archaeology of Global Change: The Impact of Humans on Their Environment. Smithsonian Books, Washington DC. Pp 158-164.

C. L. Redman and A. P. Kinzig (2003)
Resilience of Past Landscapes: Resilience Theory, Society and the Longue Durée. Conservation Ecology 7(1):14.

C.L. Redman, J.M. Grove, L. Kuby (2004)
Integrating Social Science into the Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network: Social Dimensions of Ecolgoical Change and Ecological Dimensions of Social Change. Ecosystems (7(2):161-171.

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Contact: Charles L. Redman